Pet Advice

All of Wilston Vet's blogging is updated on this page. To view our latest information, pet care advice and news, please visit the side menu and select which category interests you.  

Grass Seeds

Grass Seeds

Springtime means grass seed season, and for something so tiny, they can cause a lot of big problems for your pet! The issues they can cause range from minor discomfort right through to potentially life-threatening conditions.

Grass seeds are naturally designed to travel – they are small, lightweight, come in all different shapes, and are spiky or sticky, meaning they can be easily picked up and caught in all kinds of uncomfortable places – it can be tricky to know what to look for.

When checking your pet for grass seeds, make sure to inspect their coat thoroughly – the hair can become matted if the seed has been there for a longer period. Be sure to remove the seed as soon as you see it (pick or cut it out of your pet’s fur), as it can easily become lodged in another area, causing bigger issues.

Be sure to keep an eye out for grass seeds in these other areas:

  • Feet – this is the most common place for grass seeds to cause problems. Once lodged in the skin between the toes, they can track deeply into the foot itself. This can create a ‘draining sinus’ – which is a small hole in the foot, which oozes discharge. Look for persistent licking at the feet/toes, limping, swelling and discharge.

  • Eyes – your pet’s eye can become irritated, red, sore and potentially swollen if there is a seed stuck here. This can lead to ulcers on the eyes, and potentially further problems. Look for discharge or rubbing of the eye area.

  • Nose – grass seeds can easily be sucked into your pet’s nasal passages while they are sniffing around. If the seed makes it all the way to the lungs, it can cause serious infection. Look for persistent sneezing and nasal discharge.

  • Ears – seeds lodged in the ears are particularly dangerous. The can lead to a ruptured eardrum and chronic ear infections. Look for a sudden head tilt, persistent head shaking or ear flicking, and red, inflamed ears which may be smelly and have discharge.

  • Mouth & throat – a lodged seed could easily be pushed through tissue and move to internal organs, causing a whole new suite of problems. Look for coughing, gagging/retching, pawing at the mouth, excessive salivation/drooling, reluctance to eat or drink, or your pet appearing generally unwell.

Unfortunately, grass seeds are an unavoidable part of having fun outside in the warmer months. Try to keep your pet away from longer grass (especially if you can see the seeds!) and make brushing a regular occurrence after a walk or time outside. Always check thoroughly between every toe after a walk in grass seed areas.

Keeping long hair on feet and paws trimmed short will help with preventing grass seeds being caught, and makes finding and removing them much easier.

If you cannot remove a grass seed from your pet’s coat (with your fingers, tweezers or scissors), give us a call to organise removal. If you find a seed lodged in their skin, mouth, eyes, ears, or another body part – please do not try to remove it yourself! You can inadvertently push the seed further into the tissue, making removal far more complicated.

 

If you have any questions or concerns, give us a call on 07 3357 3882 today, or book an appointment online.

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Feline AIDS

Feline AIDS

The Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) causes feline AIDS and is relatively common in Australia and New Zealand, with up to 25% of domestic cats testing positive for the virus.

This disease is incurable. It compromises the efficiency of a cat’s immune system by killing or damaging cells – allowing them to be far more susceptible and likely to succumb to common illnesses and viruses.

How is FIV transmitted?
The virus is spread by blood or saliva transfer between cats, through:

  • Biting (between fighting or mating cats)
  • A mother cat and her kittens

What are the symptoms of FIV?
Symptoms may not develop for many years in a large percentage of infected cats, and some may never experience any. When symptoms do develop, the most commonly observed are: 

  • Severe dental (and gum) disease
  • Weight loss
  • Kidney disease
  • Eye and mouth discharge
  • Swollen/enlarged lymph nodes
  • Fever
  • Eye diseases
  • Neurological issues


How is feline AIDS treated?
Unfortunately, there is no cure or specific treatment for feline AIDS.
Veterinarians will treat each individual problem in an infected cat as and when it occurs. Often, the cat will appear to return to full health before they become ill again.


Protect your cat from FIV
You can protect your cat to an extent by keeping them indoors and limiting their exposure to unknown cats.

We recommend vaccination for high-risk cats. Vaccination will cover two strains of FIV, and is up to 80% effective.
We will run a test to ensure your cat has not already contracted the virus before beginning a vaccination program and annual booster shot. 

Call our team on 07 3357 3882 or book online today to organise your appointment.

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Bee stings

Bee stings

With springtime upon us, we can expect to see more blossoming trees and flowers popping up all over the garden – and with that comes bees. Your dog or cat might think a bee is a harmless new friend, providing a bit of excitement and fun with a game of chase! Often this can result in your pet receiving a bee sting to the face, mouth, or paws.

Has my pet been stung?
It will be very clear almost immediately if your pet has been stung. Keep an eye out for:

  • A sudden or continuing cry from your pet, indicating pain and discomfort
  • Your pet running around in circles or otherwise erratically
  • Licking, chewing, or pawing the same spot repeatedly
  • Unusual swelling
  • Excessive drooling
  • Pale gums

In some extreme cases, pets can experience severe reactions and experience vomiting, collapse, hives, profound swelling, and difficulty breathing. If your pet has been stung by more than one bee or in the mouth or throat, their reaction is more likely to be severe, and they can potentially experience anaphylactic shock. It is essential to act fast.

What should I do if my pet has been stung?
Stay calm! Panicking will only increase your pet’s stress.
The stinger will continue to release venom until it has been removed, causing pain and discomfort.

If you have noticed any of the above-mentioned severe reactions, give us a call and make your way in to see us immediately. 

If your pet is having a mild reaction and experiencing discomfort only:

  • Try to locate the site of the sting
  • If you can find it, remove the stinger gently with tweezers

Once you are sure the stinger has been removed:

  • Apply cool water via washing the site or pressing it gently with a wet cloth.
  • Keep an eye on your pet for any developing symptoms, and ensure they are well hydrated.

If your pet appears uncomfortable or develops a more severe reaction after removing the sting, please give us a call for further advice.

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Bush Fire Appeal 2020

Bush Fire Appeal 2020

Thank you to everyone who donated generously to support rehabilitation efforts for wildlife affected by the recent bushfires.

We are happy to report that $442.40 was raised by our recent bushfire relief fundraiser – as Wilston Vet will match this dollar-for-dollar, the total amount raised is $884.80.

These funds will go directly to NSW WIRES (Wildlife Information Rescue and Education Services) to provide immediate assistance to cover the costs associated with the rescue and care of animals affected by the devastating fires.

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Kirra the Staffy Cross- The Treat That Nearly Killed Her

Kirra the Staffy Cross- The Treat That Nearly Killed Her

Name: Kirra
Species: Canine
Breed: Cross breed
Sex: Female – Speyed
Age: 3yrs
Current Weight: 23kgs

History: Kirra was presented to Wilston Vet Surgery because she was very lethargic and hadn’t eaten in 3 days. She had also been vomiting for 48 hours on and off. Kirra had been taken to the Pet ER, the emergency after-hours center, a week prior as she had been drooling excessively.

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Bella the Labbie- A Life Threatening Infection

Bella the Labbie- A Life Threatening Infection

Name: Bella
Breed: Golden Labrador
Age: 6years, 8 months
Female: Not desexed.

History: Bella presented to Wilston Vet with an unusual history. Her owners had removed a tick about 4 weeks prior, but in the few days leading up to her presentation, she had started to limp and appear weak in her hind legs. Bella also had just come of heat. (Female dogs that are not desexed come into heat every 6 months)

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RSPCA Cupcake Day 2019

RSPCA Cupcake Day 2019

Well Millie is very happy with her RSPCA Cupcake as are we. Thanks to everyone who came in and donated and ate some cupcakes with us! Thanks also to those who donated on line and a big thank-you to our Wilston Vet chefs. We managed to raise a total of $500 for the RSPCA with our cupcake day. A special thank-you to Dr Karen who was the baker who baked all the pet friendly cupcakes! Millie will agree that they were sensational! Look out for next Cupcake Day in August 2020

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Dusty- Double Trouble!

Dusty- Double Trouble!

Name: Dusty
Species: Canine
Breed: Beagle
Sex: Female spey
Age: 9y 2m
Weight: 18.2kg

History: This is a tale of a patient who presented for one procedure and ended up having another! Dusty is a lovely Beagle who first presented to Dr Kate with a very sore back leg after running around outside one night. Dr Kate prescribed anti-inflammatory pain medication and strict rest for 5 days. Dusty’s lameness improved initially with treatment, but recurred, so Dr Kate recommended x-rays of the leg under anaesthesia.

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Help us keep everyone safe from COVID-19.

Please do not visit if you have:
  • Fever or symptoms of respiratory infection (cough, sore throat, shortness of breath)
  • Returned from overseas in the last 14 days
  • Been in close contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the last 14 days
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